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Andrea Romano

Teacher

Andrea Romano

Teacher


Graduate in Humanities
University of Udine

Andrea Romano

Teacher


Graduate in Humanities
University of Udine

Teacher

My name is Andrea Romano. I have graduated with honors in Humanities at the University of Udine, then, in 2005, I got a teaching qualification and since 2008 I am indeed regular teacher of Italian literature and Latin in high school.

The Interview

What led you to choose Humanistic Studies?

I have always had wonderful teachers in those subjects, in middle school as well as in high school. They were my role models. Moreover, I have always been interested in the past, in the dialogue with our ancestors, upon whose shoulders we climb in order to see further – as medieval philosophers used to say. I have to admit that, at the time, I was also a bit posh regarding studies about practical, political and economical issues, but I see now that I was wrong.

Have you ever been abroad during your university education?

No, I have not.

What role does your humanistic education play in your current occupation?

My education has been essential in this sense. Even though I had an active part in building it (by reading many fundamental texts for my personal growth without being asked to), I remember with particular affection my high school years: never have I ever studied with such a burning passion as then. Under this point of view, my university experience was different, even lighter, but it taught me how to approach study in an autentic scientific way

Do you think that humanistic studies could pave the way for various careers?

I am convinced that humanistic studies are thoroughly edifying. However, I am also convinced that, on a more professional level, the first choice of a graduate in this field should be teaching: I do not see many other possibilities (aside from journalism, publishing and little else), and besides, those who are fond of Humanities often feel the need to pass on their knowledge to young people, who then, on their part, will do the same in a virtuous loop that we might call "educational mission".

What would you recommend to young people struggling with the choice of the right study programme?

Follow your own vocation. Do not base your education on family tradition, influence of friends or the desire to find an easy job within the civil service. Your studies will require you to endure and sacrifice: if you are not ready, you would better choose something else, therefore my suggestion is, be realistic.